State Seminar and Tour of Historic Little Rock Central High School Attended by Local Heritage Volunteers

State Seminar and Tour of Historic Little Rock Central High School Attended by Local Heritage Volunteers

Two residents from Randolph County attended the “Profiles in Arkansas Black History” seminar at the Historic Arkansas Museum in Little Rock Saturday, June 14. Pat Johnson, Chairperson for the Eddie Mae Herron Center Board of Directors, and Cindy Robinett, Administrator of the Randolph County Heritage Museum were joined by others from across the state for a day of presentations about significant African-Americans throughout Arkansas’ history. Pat Johnson is seen above with two of the many speakers. On the left is Dr. Patricia Washington McGraw, a Little Rock native, who became the first African-American professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Today, at age 70, she is an author, activist and enthusiastic speaker. In the middle is Mr. Milton P. Crenchaw, also from Little Rock, who was the senior flight instructor at Tuskegee Institute known for the training of the famed Tuskegee Airmen during World War II. In 2007, he and fellow Tuskegee Airmen were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in Washington D.C. Mr. Crenchaw is 90 years old. The workshop was sponsored by the Black History Commission of Arkansas and the Arkansas History Commission. Following the seminar, Johnson and Robinett drove to the Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, and toured the educational center and walked across the historic campus. In 1954, the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision officially declared segregation in public schools as unconstitutional. All U.S. public schools were instructed to integrate. Within a week, Arkansas was one of two Southern states to announce it would begin immediately to take steps to comply with the new ruling. The...
2008 Martin Luther King Day March

2008 Martin Luther King Day March

Marchers sang spirituals as they marched the nine blocks from the Randolph County Courthouse, north on Marr Street to the Pocahontas Community Center, where they heard speeches on the significance of Dr. King and the Martin Luther King federal holiday. Following the gathering at the Community Center the crowd moved to the warmth of the Eddie Mae Herron Center for a lunch of hot...
KAIT TV Interview

KAIT TV Interview

Region 8 Museum Celebrates Black History Month View Video: Pocahontas Museum Dedicated to Black History POCAHONTAS, AR (KAIT) — Black History Month was established in 1976 as an expansion of Negro History Week, which was first started fifty years earlier in 1926. Originally a date marked to honor the birth date of Frederick Douglass, the month long celebration now reflects on the remembrance of important people and events in the history of African-American culture. A look around the Eddie Mae Herron center in Pocahontas will take you back in time. What was once the Pocahontas Colored School, it’s now a museum dedicated to the rich African American culture in Randolph County. “We don’t want to forget,” said director Pat Johnson, “We don’t want to forget the struggles that we had and we want to educate the younger people now in the community and around.” The Eddie Mae Herron Center has been in Pocahontas for almost half a century and serves as the hub for religious activity for the African American community, which makes up about 2% of Randolph County’s total population. A freedom quilt that maps out routes slaves took to get to the north is just part of the exhibits used to teach African American history here. But Johnson believes passing down an oral history is one of the most important lessons today’s youth can learn. “We have oral history program where we get the children to come in and we have the older people come in and talk to them about the times that they were young people and then the children ask them questions,” said Johnson....