50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act

On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law. This landmark law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race in public accommodations, in publicly owned or operated facilities, in employment and union membership and in the registration of voters. To mark the anniversary, the U.S. Census Bureau has gathered key statistics that measure changes in some characteristics of different race groups to date. Note: This analysis uses the closest available year for each race/ethnic group to the historic act. Analysis is limited because of limited historical data for all racial and ethnic groups. Population 1964 2013 20,671,914 The total estimated black population in the United States. 41,623,897 The total estimated black population in the United States. 10.8% The estimated percentage of the U.S. population that was black. 13.2% The estimated percentage of the U.S. population that was black. 1970 2013 9.6 million The total estimated Hispanic population in the United States. 54.1 million The total estimated Hispanic population in the United States. 4.7% The estimated percentage of the U.S. population that was Hispanic. 17.1% The estimated percentage of the U.S. population that was Hispanic. 1960 2013 980,337 The total Asian and Pacific Islander population in the United States. 16,632,553 The total estimated Asian population in the United States. 0.5% The percentage of the U.S. population that was Asian and Pacific Islander. 5.3% The estimated percentage of the U.S. population that was Asian. 1960 2013 551,669 The total American Indian, Eskimo and Aleut population in the United States. 3,910,028 The total estimated American Indian and Alaska Native population in the United States. 0.3%...
Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr

Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr

Today marks the 45th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1968. He was 39 years old. He was rushed to St. Joseph’s Hospital where he was pronounced dead. James Earl Ray, a fugitive from the Missouri State Penitentiary was charged with the crime. Ray entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to 99 years in the Tennessee state penitentiary. King had traveled to Memphis in support of striking African American sanitation workers who were protesting unequal wages and working...
Rewriting History: The Forgotten Records

Rewriting History: The Forgotten Records

Most residents have heard the story that the first school for African-American children in Randolph County was a one-room school opened by sisters at St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Pocahontas circa 1888. It is also believed that this was the first school of its kind in Arkansas. Additionally, the story goes that the school closed after a short time due to outrage in the white community over educating local blacks. This story has long been believed as fact. The story has been published in books, articles, and online resources such as the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. The above photo is the only known image to exist of the school, take around 1889. The photo includes several children along with Father Eugene Weibel and Sister Agnes Dali. In the spring of 2012, local historian Cindy Robinett was doing some genealogical research for EMHC and after thinking about the story of the school, contacted Jennifer Nichols, church secretary at St. Paul, to see if there might be any records of African-American individuals who were associated with the one-room school. What happened as a result of that initial search has actually changed the history of African-American education in Arkansas. Soon Nichols called Robinett and excitedly relayed that a record book for the school had been found in the St. Paul Church archives and it dated from 1894-1909! The public was invited to attend a free presentation on Saturday evening, October 13, starting around 7:15 pm at the Eddie Mae Herron Museum/Center located at 1708 Archer Street, where they discussed the school, the findings in the record book, race and religious relations in Randolph County at the dawn of the 20 th Century,...
The History of Black History Month

The History of Black History Month

Black History Month celebration of achievements of African-Americans and the recognition of African-Americans and their role in U.S. history. Black history month was originally know as, “Negro History Week,” founded by Carter G. Woodson. In 1976, the month of February has been designated as Black History Month.  Along with the USA, Canada and the United Kingdom also celebrate Black History Month. Carter G. Woodson found that while in school his history books were void of the history of the black American population and when they were present they were portrayed in inferior positions. Woodson decided he would write African Americans into U.S. history. He established the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History in 1915. In 1926, Negro History Week was bought about to the attention of the nation to show the  contributions of black people throughout American history. The second week of February was chosen because it marks the birthdays of, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln, both were influential in African-American history. For more information on black history month, you can visit the following sites: http://www.history.com/topics/black-history-month http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_History_Month http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/ http://www.biography.com/tv/classroom/about-black-history-month http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/heritage_month/bhm/index.html http://www.nps.gov/history/aahistory/ http://edsitement.neh.gov/black-history-month#node-19469 Like us on Facebook for daily African American History Facts & Quotes by Historic African Americans during the month of...